Does My Child Need Bunion Surgery? Juvenile and Adolescent Hallux Valgus

Does My Child Need Bunion Surgery? Juvenile and Adolescent Hallux Valgus

Does My Child Need Bunion Surgery? Juvenile and Adolescent Hallux Valgus

Yes, it is true. Bunions can develop in children due to trauma or genetic predisposition. Properly termed, juvenile Hallux valgus, the bunion that develops in children can occur as early as 6 years old and cause the same effects as an adult bunion. The painful swelling in the metatarsophalangeal joint at the base of the big toe can lead to embarrassment, unwanted pain from shoe rubbing or bumping and limited physical activity. The first step in the right direction is by contacting the foot doctor Los Angeles patients trust most to evaluate the severity of the issue, only then will we be able to determine the need forĀ bunion surgery.

Bunion surgery is a serious procedure that is likely the last solution for a child because their feet are still growing with the rest of the body. The foot type is usually what causes the deformity to be passed down to our offspring which is where their bones of the arch have fully formed allowing them to run, jump or play. When the child develops a bunion on the toe joint it is usually painful and experience the same deformity as adults would when the bump on the big toe joint crowds the second and third metatarsal. What do you do then? Fortunately, there are conservative solutions to help slow and eliminate the progression of bunions.

Bunion Prevention Tips

Parents can help prevent the progression of bunions early on and evade the likes of bunion surgery. Typically, proper shoe selection is the first step in the right direction. Whenever you and your child go out shoe shopping, keep the following tips in mind:

  • Have both feet of your child foot measured each time before purchasing new shoes.

  • Go with larger size if one foot is larger than the other.

  • The area around the Achilles should never be too tight, select a wider shoe if possible.

  • Have your child wear the socks they are likely to wear with the new shoes.

  • Avoid purchasing high heels or ballet slippers.

Alongside selecting the proper shoes, it is also recommended to have custom orthotics to help slow down bunion growth. Custom or over-the-counter orthotics are simple inserts designed to relieve pain in feet and allow comfortable movement. Orthotics are usually for children older than the age of 6, because by then their normal arch should have developed. Some children do not develop a proper arch and because of that they may benefit from orthotics to provide support for the arches, which can improve running performance. If bunion symptoms and pain are still causing discomfort in your child, then scheduling an appointment with a podiatrist Los Angeles specialist may help you find an efficient solution.

Bunions Are Hereditary

Bunions are very common among women and recent studies indicate that more than a third of older adults experience them. Narrowing it down a little, a study from theĀ journal Arthritis Care & Research, an official journal of the American College of Rheumatology, shows that many common foot disorders, including bunions and hammertoe appear to be inherited, particularly among white men and women of European descent. Thus, these findings of heritability of foot disorders in patients confirm that Hallux valgus and lesser toe deformities lay down the importance of identifying genetic determinants of the fundamental issues of susceptibility. Furthermore, a previous study from the same journal also showed that if bunions become more common as people age, so if your kids do not develop them at an early age, they may have them at a later point in life.

For a top bunion surgeon Los Angeles parents choose for children experiencing foot pain fatigue, asking to be carried or not participating in spots, call (310) 247-9255 today to schedule an appointment with Dr. Jam. His experienced and friendly staff is available to prove why he is the foot doctor Los Angeles patients choose for bunion surgery and bunion heredity in children.